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Posted May 14, 2014 - 6:07am

Editor's note: This article was originally scheduled to appear in the Messianic Times the week before Passover, but did not appear due to unforeseen circumstances (hence the reference to Passover).

The Struggle

After Moses received the commandments on Mount Sinai, Scripture says that he “took the Book of the Covenant and read it in the hearing of the people” (Exodus 24:7). Immediately, the Children of Israel responded by saying, Kol asher diber Hashem na’aseh v’nishmah — “All that the LORD has spoken we will do, and we will hear.” They immediately resolved to submit to the voice of the Holy One and live within the parameters set forth for them as a redeemed people. However, as we know, this resolve did not have lasting results. Shortly thereafter, their Redeemer quickly took a back seat to the egel hazahav, the golden calf. It seems that within both Judaism and Christianity, this has been the struggle of our spiritual existence ever since.

James, the brother of our Master, reminds us that even after the coming of Messiah, his followers continued to struggle with the same duplicity. He commissions the disciples of Yeshua to “be doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves. For if anyone is a hearer of the word and not a doer, he is like a man who looks intently at his natural face in a mirror. For he looks at himself and goes away and at once forgets what he was like. But the one who looks into the perfect law, the law of liberty, and perseveres, being no hearer who forgets but a doer who acts, he will be blessed in his doing” (James 1:22–25). Do we, as Messianics, struggle with these issues even today?

Posted April 30, 2014 - 5:13am

How does Yeshua use the Torah to deal with adultery?

 

Let’s take a look at an example in which deliberate judgment is demonstrated by Jesus in the case of the woman “caught in the very act of adultery” (according to the KJV) from the eighth chapter of the Gospel of John. Although most are familiar with this passage, let us refresh our memory before we continue. 

Early in the morning he came again to the temple. All the people came to him, and he sat down and taught them. The scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman who had been caught in adultery, and placing her in the midst they said to him, “Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery. Now in the Law Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say?” This they said to test him, that they might have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and wrote with his finger on the ground. And as they continued to ask him, he stood up and said to them, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” And once more he bent down and wrote on the ground. But when they heard it, they went away one by one, beginning with the older ones, and Jesus was left alone with the woman standing before him. Jesus stood up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.” (John 8:2-11) 

Posted April 25, 2014 - 8:37am

Recently the Messianic Times has asked me to join their blogging team and post a once-a-month blog. We had some complications last month and it didn't make it, but as of today we are up and running. My "column" is called "Hear and Do" and is focused on addressing issues such as the struggle with hypocrisy among Believers (Messianics in particular), biblical ethics, Jewish prayer and more.

Please keep this endeavor in your prayers. We are in serious need of exposure. We currently do not have the support we need to continue our mission. Please pray that this opens doors for Emet HaTorah and speaks to the hearts of our readers.

I WOULD APPRECIATE YOUR CONTACTING THE MESSIANIC TIMES AND THANKING THEM FOR ADDING ME TO THEIR BLOG TEAM, so that they know people are reading the blog posts.

You can view my current blog post ("On Three Things") here:

http://www.messianictimes.com/messianic-lifestyle

Posted April 23, 2014 - 5:23am

The Torah is the terms of the covenant between God and His redeemed people. It was given, not just to Moses, but to an entire people at Sinai nearly 3500 years ago. It was God’s initial self-disclosure of His holiness and righteousness to an entire people group.

Although the word messiah literally means “anointed one,” its connotation is that of king. It is a reference to the one who will bring all of Israel (and the entire world) into submission under a central authority. The king of Israel is required to write for himself a copy of the Torah in order to remember that he doesn’t have authority over the Torah, but that the Torah gives him his ruling authority and he must rule within its parameters — those parameters established at Sinai by the Creator of the Universe. Deuteronomy spells out these terms: And when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself in a book a copy of this law, approved by the Levitical priests. And it shall be with him, and he shall read in it all the days of his life, that he may learn to fear the Lord his God by keeping all the words of this law and these statutes, and doing them, that his heart may not be lifted up above his brothers, and that he may not turn aside from the commandment, either to the right hand or to the left, so that he may continue long in his kingdom, he and his children, in Israel (Deuteronomy 17:18–20).

Just a few chapters before this, we are given a few of the parameters which would be among those which would determine if Jesus (or any person) met the qualifications of a prophet or leader of Israel:

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Latest Book Review

The Magerman Edition

Author: Daniel Rose & Jay Goldmintz
Publisher: Koren Publishers
Year: 2014

The Koren Ani Tefilla Siddur is one of the latest in Koren’s growing collection of siddurim (prayer books) geared towards a specific demographic. Koren describes Ani Tefilla as “an engaging and thought-provoking siddur for the inquiring high school student and thoughtful adult.” Koren says that Ani Tefillah has been developed in order “to help the user create their own meaning and connection during the Tefilla [prayer] experience.” The name of the siddur is connected with its objective. Ani Tefilla means “I pray.” 

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