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Posted April 1, 2014 - 11:41am

Intro to Mishnah & Talmud graphic

If you've read or heard quotes from the Talmud or the Mishnah, but don't know the first thing about either, this Introduction to Talmud & Mishnah class will help you to understand the basics of both. We will learn the following:

  • Terms (such as Bavli, Yerushalmi, Daf Yomi, Gemara, etc.)
  • How to navigate the tractates (books)
  • How to look up a reference such as m.Avot 4:1 or b.Shabbat 88a
  • How to access online resources and which sources to avoid
  • Famous personalities of the Mishnah & Talmud
  • Overarching themes of the Mishnah & Talmud
  • Connections between the Mishnah/Talmud and the teachings of Yeshua

This course is being taught in conjunction with and immediately precedes the Pirkei Avot & The Teachings of Yeshua course.

Classes will be held at Kehillat Messianic Congregation, 151 Fred Rains Drive, Sherwood, AR.

Posted March 17, 2014 - 7:54am

In less than a month, Passover will be upon us. The season of Redemption will soon be in our midst. In order to help you enter into the season with the proper mental perspective, you might want to enjoy this teaching podcast I did with Gabriel Rutledge of The Grafted In Perspective. It's called, "Guarding the Matzah," and in it we discuss a hidden principle found within the book of Exodus that can only be seen in the Hebrew. From this lesson we learn the subtle difference between regular bread and unleavened bread (matzah) and what Yeshua would have been trying to teach his disciples when he warned them to "beware of the yeast of the Pharisees." Do we contain yeast without even realizing it? Find out more in this podcast episode, "Guarding the Matzah."

Posted February 28, 2014 - 11:53am

As disciples of Yeshua, one of our responsibilities is to imitate him. One of the examples he gives us is when he tells his disciples to gather up the crumbs from the miracles of feeding the multitudes. Why did he do this? Since he likened his teachings to that of bread from heaven, one possibility is that it was to teach his disciples to not loose one of his teachings. We are to collect them and consider even the "scraps" as precious. The bulk of these teachings by our Master reside within the Gospels.

If you didn't know it already, we have been working our way through the Gospels chronologically, from a Messianic Jewish perspective since the beginning of last October. We have been recording our classes and posting them on this site (usually posted on Fridays, since the class is held Thursday night). But only recently have we opened the audio for these classes to the public. If you want to be a serious disciples of the Master and learn his teachings and cling to even the "crumbs" of his words, why not start by studying along with us each week? Attached you will find a snippet from our most recent audio class discussing the delicate balance between our intimacy with the Father and our obedience to Him in conjunction to our responsibility of working towards tikkun olam (repair of the world). Take a listen to this sample and then join us each week as we study the life and teachings of our Master… Yeshua the Messiah.

Posted December 29, 2013 - 6:03am

In our study thus far, we have seen how the Gospel — the Good News — of John the Immerser, Jesus, the Apostles (represented by Peter) and Paul are all in agreement as to its basic content. The Gospel first proclaimed by John pointed to a coming King who held judg­ment in his hands. Of him, John said,

I baptize you with water for repentance, but he who is coming after me is mightier than I, whose sandals I am not worthy to carry. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing floor and gather his wheat into the barn, but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire. (Matthew 3:11–12)

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Latest Book Review

The Magerman Edition

Author: Daniel Rose & Jay Goldmintz
Publisher: Koren Publishers
Year: 2014

The Koren Ani Tefilla Siddur is one of the latest in Koren’s growing collection of siddurim (prayer books) geared towards a specific demographic. Koren describes Ani Tefilla as “an engaging and thought-provoking siddur for the inquiring high school student and thoughtful adult.” Koren says that Ani Tefillah has been developed in order “to help the user create their own meaning and connection during the Tefilla [prayer] experience.” The name of the siddur is connected with its objective. Ani Tefilla means “I pray.” 

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