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Posted April 30, 2014 - 5:13am

How does Yeshua use the Torah to deal with adultery?


Let’s take a look at an example in which deliberate judgment is demonstrated by Jesus in the case of the woman “caught in the very act of adultery” (according to the KJV) from the eighth chapter of the Gospel of John. Although most are familiar with this passage, let us refresh our memory before we continue. 

Early in the morning he came again to the temple. All the people came to him, and he sat down and taught them. The scribes and the Pharisees brought a woman who had been caught in adultery, and placing her in the midst they said to him, “Teacher, this woman has been caught in the act of adultery. Now in the Law Moses commanded us to stone such women. So what do you say?” This they said to test him, that they might have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and wrote with his finger on the ground. And as they continued to ask him, he stood up and said to them, “Let him who is without sin among you be the first to throw a stone at her.” And once more he bent down and wrote on the ground. But when they heard it, they went away one by one, beginning with the older ones, and Jesus was left alone with the woman standing before him. Jesus stood up and said to her, “Woman, where are they? Has no one condemned you?” She said, “No one, Lord.” And Jesus said, “Neither do I condemn you; go, and from now on sin no more.” (John 8:2-11) 

Posted April 25, 2014 - 8:37am

Recently the Messianic Times has asked me to join their blogging team and post a once-a-month blog. We had some complications last month and it didn't make it, but as of today we are up and running. My "column" is called "Hear and Do" and is focused on addressing issues such as the struggle with hypocrisy among Believers (Messianics in particular), biblical ethics, Jewish prayer and more.

Please keep this endeavor in your prayers. We are in serious need of exposure. We currently do not have the support we need to continue our mission. Please pray that this opens doors for Emet HaTorah and speaks to the hearts of our readers.


You can view my current blog post ("On Three Things") here:

Posted April 23, 2014 - 5:23am

The Torah is the terms of the covenant between God and His redeemed people. It was given, not just to Moses, but to an entire people at Sinai nearly 3500 years ago. It was God’s initial self-disclosure of His holiness and righteousness to an entire people group.

Although the word messiah literally means “anointed one,” its connotation is that of king. It is a reference to the one who will bring all of Israel (and the entire world) into submission under a central authority. The king of Israel is required to write for himself a copy of the Torah in order to remember that he doesn’t have authority over the Torah, but that the Torah gives him his ruling authority and he must rule within its parameters — those parameters established at Sinai by the Creator of the Universe. Deuteronomy spells out these terms: And when he sits on the throne of his kingdom, he shall write for himself in a book a copy of this law, approved by the Levitical priests. And it shall be with him, and he shall read in it all the days of his life, that he may learn to fear the Lord his God by keeping all the words of this law and these statutes, and doing them, that his heart may not be lifted up above his brothers, and that he may not turn aside from the commandment, either to the right hand or to the left, so that he may continue long in his kingdom, he and his children, in Israel (Deuteronomy 17:18–20).

Just a few chapters before this, we are given a few of the parameters which would be among those which would determine if Jesus (or any person) met the qualifications of a prophet or leader of Israel:

Posted April 18, 2014 - 5:20am

The problem with fences, they say, is that not only do they keep some peo­ple in, but they keep others out. While this is definitely true, and regarding this prin­ciple one should definitely exercise caution, we should not, however, “throw the baby out with the bath water.” While some fences are built to the extreme (i.e. you don’t need a 20 ft fence to keep your dogs in the yard), a prop­erly built fence keeps in the children and pets, keeps out the unwanted solicitors & preda­tors, and maintains a healthy relationship with the neighbors. It’s the same with Torah. The fence must be built properly in order to merit its usefulness.

According to Pirkei Avot (1:1), the Men of the Great Assembly commissioned their dis­ciples to “build a fence around the Torah.” This principle of building a “fence” around Torah is based off of Leviticus 18:30, which states, “You shall safeguard My charge not to do any of the abominable traditions that were done before you...” as well as various other passages. The children of Israel were to guard against fall­ing to the lure of sin by doing whatever it took in order to ensure that not even one of the least of the commandments was broken. Lest they become negligent in their obser­vance, certain regulations were set in place to ensure the protection of the commandments. These “fences” served as a safeguard and means of protection for not only the Torah, but also for the individual who might haphaz­ardly violate one of the commandments and therefore come under subjection to the con­sequences thereof.


Latest Book Review

The Magerman Edition

Author: Daniel Rose & Jay Goldmintz
Publisher: Koren Publishers
Year: 2014

The Koren Ani Tefilla Siddur is one of the latest in Koren’s growing collection of siddurim (prayer books) geared towards a specific demographic. Koren describes Ani Tefilla as “an engaging and thought-provoking siddur for the inquiring high school student and thoughtful adult.” Koren says that Ani Tefillah has been developed in order “to help the user create their own meaning and connection during the Tefilla [prayer] experience.” The name of the siddur is connected with its objective. Ani Tefilla means “I pray.” 


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